prepaidafrica:

Akuja de Garang at home in Juba, South Sudan. Photo by Christina Reynolds.
Akuja de Garang was just eight years old when the war forced her family to flee South Sudan in 1983. But, in 2004, with a degree in African studies and a master’s in development from the University of London, she came back with a yearning to help rebuild her community.
“Home is home,” she tells me with a faint British accent as we sip rosehip tea in the airy kitchen of her eclectically decorated home in the capital city of Juba.
“This house was my mom’s,” she says quietly of the space she now shares with her husband, Papit, and their two dogs, Rumbek and Letsatsi.
“It’s incredible that it wasn’t destroyed in the war.”
“It’s a social enterprise meant to awaken creative identities,” she says. (“Pach” means “awakening” in a number of Nilotic languages.)
“I’m fascinated by traditional South Sudanese crafts and artifacts, but because of the strain of civil war and inter-tribal violence, they are in danger of being lost. People don’t recognize the value of what they have—they have unique skills,” she says.
(via ELLE World: Coming home to South Sudan - Elle Canada)

prepaidafrica:

Akuja de Garang at home in Juba, South Sudan. Photo by Christina Reynolds.

Akuja de Garang was just eight years old when the war forced her family to flee South Sudan in 1983. But, in 2004, with a degree in African studies and a master’s in development from the University of London, she came back with a yearning to help rebuild her community.

“Home is home,” she tells me with a faint British accent as we sip rosehip tea in the airy kitchen of her eclectically decorated home in the capital city of Juba.

“This house was my mom’s,” she says quietly of the space she now shares with her husband, Papit, and their two dogs, Rumbek and Letsatsi.

“It’s incredible that it wasn’t destroyed in the war.”

“It’s a social enterprise meant to awaken creative identities,” she says. (“Pach” means “awakening” in a number of Nilotic languages.)

“I’m fascinated by traditional South Sudanese crafts and artifacts, but because of the strain of civil war and inter-tribal violence, they are in danger of being lost. People don’t recognize the value of what they have—they have unique skills,” she says.

(via ELLE World: Coming home to South Sudan - Elle Canada)

(via prepaidafrica)


British-South Sudanese basketball player Luol Deng giving back this summer in Juba, South Sudan. 

British-South Sudanese basketball player Luol Deng giving back this summer in Juba, South Sudan. 

(Source: 1love4southsudan, via )

kaliem:

Adam Sidig Bashir (L), 18, and Matar Abdallah  Adam, 19, both blind members of the Sudanese Association for Disabled  People, are seen at the organization’s center in El Fasher November 17,  2011. The International Day of Persons with Disabilities is observed on  December 3.  REUTERS/UNAMID/Albert Gonzalez Farran/Handout

kaliem:

Adam Sidig Bashir (L), 18, and Matar Abdallah Adam, 19, both blind members of the Sudanese Association for Disabled People, are seen at the organization’s center in El Fasher November 17, 2011. The International Day of Persons with Disabilities is observed on December 3. REUTERS/UNAMID/Albert Gonzalez Farran/Handout

(via ohyeahsudan)

South Sudan Brings in New Business Opportunity

by Abduel Elinaza

The South Sudan brings in new business opportunity that Tanzanians exploit in terms of investments and export of goods and services. But, the new market is not one without challenges. First, South Sudan belongs to a different trading bloc-Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA).

Second, is the long distance between Dar es Salaam and Juba, the capital city of the 54th African state. Unlike Kenya and Ugandan goods that enjoy preferential treatment in South Sudan under COMESA, the Tanzanian goods will be subjected to high tariffs because they don’t originate from the trading bloc member.

The long distance between Dar es Salaam and Juba, coupled with poor road infrastructure is another serious challenge that the Tanzanian products face in competing in the Juba market.

Confederation of Tanzania Industries (CTI) Director of Policy and Research Hussein Kamote says “our goods face serious challenges and can hardly compete with Kenya and Ugandan goods in South Sudan’s market.”

He however advises the local business community to remain buoyant with the challenges and continue looking for business opportunities in the new African state. Mr Kamote underscores the importance of Juba joining the East African Community (EAC) to enable Tanzanian products compete with Kenya and Ugandan goods at level grounds in the Sudanese market.

Products from North Sudan will likely dominate the Juba market because of proximity of the two countries. South Sudan needs almost all industrial goods ranging from cooking oils, toilet soaps, maize and wheat flours and plastic goods for the two-week old nation has yet to develop its industrial sector.

But, Dar es Salaam will have tough time competing with its EAC partner’s states, particularly Kenya and Uganda that have been trading with South Sudan even before it attained its independence from the north this month. “The long time trading relation give our competitors an advantage…but we should still soldier on,” Mr Kamote says.

Kenya has already signed a number of trade protocols with South Sudan and is seeking investors to fund a 22 billion US Dollar planned corridor connecting Ethiopia and Sudan to the Kenyan coast with railways, roads, telecommunication cables and a 1,400 km pipeline.

Kampala’s figures show that South Sudan is Uganda’s main export market in the region, exporting goods worth 184.6 million US dollar in 2009.

South Sudan is rich in oil and other natural resources, but it remains one of the poorest nations on earth, with 90 percent of the population living on less than 1 US dollar a day. The population is estimated at eight million, according to a 2008 census. Sudan’s economy picked up slightly in 2010 to grow five per cent, after 4.5 per cent in 2009 but this was one percentage point lower than expected.

The economy is projected to grow 5.1 per cent in 2011 and then 5.3 per cent in 2012 largely because of increased oil production and sustained gains in the non-oil sector. The non-oil sector remains buoyant and shoinstitutions like the central bank before it can fully take off as a state. “It may also need to establish its own currency. All these will not happen over night. It is a process not an event,” says Dr Honest Ngowi of Mzumbe University’s Dar es Salaam Business School.

South Sudan is slightly larger than Kenya and is a home to about 85 per cent of Sudan’s oil output-estimated at about 520,000 barrels per day and has immense potential in agriculture, unique climate that could form the bulwark of unlimited commercial agriculture, huge forest reserves for timber and the lumber industry.

The challenge ahead for South Sudan’s authorities is to ensure macroeconomic stability and sustainability of internal and external balances by controlling the fiscal deficit, rebuilding foreign reserves and maintaining low inflation.

mindbodyproblem:

South Sudan Police Recruits at Training Academy by United Nations Photo on Flickr.
South Sudan Becomes 193rd Member of United Nations

The national flag of the newly independent South Sudan went up outside the United Nations on Thursday, shortly after becoming the world body’s 193rd member.

The U.N. General Assembly in New York admitted the country by acclamation, after a Security Council resolution recommending South Sudan for membership.

The U.S. representative to the U.N., Susan Rice, said South Sudan has taken its rightful place among the community of sovereign nations after great suffering and unimaginable lost.

South Sudan Vice President Riek Machar vowed his country will be a responsible member of the international community and respect its obligations under international law. 

Sudan’s U.N. envoy, Daffa-Alla Elhag Ali Osman, promised Sudan would work with its southern neighbor in a spirit of solidarity, cooperation and coordination for the good of their people. 

The world’s newest nation declared independence on Saturday, splitting from Sudan. The two sides fought a bloody 21-year civil war that ended in 2005.

The now neighboring countries are still trying to work out disputes over borders and oil revenue. The U.N. Security Council recently authorized deployment of a new peacekeeping force to the disputed Abyei region.

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You will find none of that here :)