How second-hand clothes kill business for Malawi’s tailors

About 10 tailors with old, noisy sewing machines stitch fabrics under the canopy of the shops in the old town of Malawi’s capital, Lilongwe, occasionally look up to reveal forlorn faces.

Osman Kabere says he has been making suits since 1978, but gone are the days when his business gave good returns.

He blames the second-hand clothes trade, which is valued at $1bn (£641m) annually in Malawi, 10 times its value in 1990.

At an expansive flea market nearby, the mood could not be more different.

shinelikeanovastar:

Cape Maclear, Lake Malawi.

shinelikeanovastar:

Cape Maclear, Lake Malawi.

thebrightcontinent:

Via Africa is a Country: 

Rose Chibambo, hero of Malawi’s independence struggle, is on the country’s new K200 banknote. She was imprisoned by the British & gave birth while in jail. Malawi’s first female cabinet minister, she rebelled against Kamuzu Banda during the Cabinet Crisis of 1964 and was exiled in Zambia for 30 years.

thebrightcontinent:

Via Africa is a Country

Rose Chibambo, hero of Malawi’s independence struggle, is on the country’s new K200 banknote. She was imprisoned by the British & gave birth while in jail. Malawi’s first female cabinet minister, she rebelled against Kamuzu Banda during the Cabinet Crisis of 1964 and was exiled in Zambia for 30 years.

shortformblog:

Malawi: Joyce Banda becomes African continent’s third-ever female head of state
A new female leader in Africa: Joyce Banda, the vice president of Malawi, was sworn in as president Saturday, two days after the death of the country’s longtime leader, Bingu wa Mutharika.  ”I call upon all Malawians to remain calm and to keep the peace during this time of bereavement,” she said. Though there were political concerns which threatened to prevent Banda from taking power — she had been removed from her party, though held onto her vice-presidential post — but when all was said and done, Banda was sworn in, a fairly smooth transition for a country in need of one. Banda is the continent’s third-ever female leader, following in the footsteps of Ethiopian Empress Zewditu and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. (photo by Mabvuto Banda/Reuters)

shortformblog:

Malawi: Joyce Banda becomes African continent’s third-ever female head of state

A new female leader in Africa: Joyce Banda, the vice president of Malawi, was sworn in as president Saturday, two days after the death of the country’s longtime leader, Bingu wa Mutharika.  ”I call upon all Malawians to remain calm and to keep the peace during this time of bereavement,” she said. Though there were political concerns which threatened to prevent Banda from taking power — she had been removed from her party, though held onto her vice-presidential post — but when all was said and done, Banda was sworn in, a fairly smooth transition for a country in need of one. Banda is the continent’s third-ever female leader, following in the footsteps of Ethiopian Empress Zewditu and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. (photo by Mabvuto Banda/Reuters)

fyeahafrica:


Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Lilongwe, Malawi. Photograph: Amos Gumulira/AFP/Getty Images
Demonstrations over fuel shortages, inflation and unemployment target Malawian president Bingu wa Mutharika
Journalists beaten and detained to prevent them covering protests.

via takeactionunite

fyeahafrica:

Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Lilongwe, Malawi. Photograph: Amos Gumulira/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrations over fuel shortages, inflation and unemployment target Malawian president Bingu wa Mutharika

Journalists beaten and detained to prevent them covering protests.

via takeactionunite

(via )

Malawi protests: President threatens tougher action

President Bingu wa Mutharika has ordered all Malawians to leave the streets forthwith, saying he might be forced to invoke his constitution powers to enforce peace in the country.

President Mutharika was addressing the nation Thursday on the second day of nationwide protests, which have spread out to the townships and have been characterised by looting, violence and sporadic running battles with the police.

The government has since deployed the military to quell the uprising.

Sounds of guns and tear gas shots were heard throughout the night in the townships in several towns in Malawi, with the violence having spilled over to other districts.

According to police information, about 300 people have been arrested in different areas. However, police were reluctant to discuss the number of deaths.

President Mutharika blames opposition political parties and civil society leaders for the deaths, looting and violence, alleging that the organisers were paying the protesters to engage in acts of violence.

“After yesterday’s protest, do we have fuel now? I order all the people in the street to leave the street now. I have the constitution powers to use every means to bring peace in Malawi,” he said.

President Mutharika said those protesting against his leadership were being guided by the devil, adding that the power of God would prevail over Malawi as Satan was a failure.

Organisers of the protest described President Mutharika’s speech as not inspiring and empty, saying it was obvious Mutharika was being told lies by the people surrounding him.

He then invited leaders of the opposition parties and civil society groups to a roundtable discussion, where they would discuss ways to iron out the differences.

One of the protest organisers, Mr Billy Banda, said civil society will give Mutharika up to August 17, 2011 to address all the concerns that were raised in the petition letters that were delivered to the city councils.

“Failure which another protest will be called,” he said.

Meanwhile, Malawi Communication Regulatory Authority (Macra), has ordered the shutdown of three radio stations.

However, Mr Banda admitted that the situation had gone out of hand as it was not anticipated that the protests would be violent.

Most Malawi forums and Facebook updates indicated that the president, in his address to the nation, failed to humble and indentify himself with the problems Malawians were facing.

Capital, Joy and MIJ radio stations were plugged off on allegation that the stations defied government orders to stop live broadcasting of the protests.

Poverty Porn - any type of media which exploits the poor’s condition in order to generate sympathy for selling newspapers or increasing charitable donations or support for a given cause.
You will find none of that here :)