turbanista:

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

turbanista:

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania
Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”

Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.

A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.

Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.

Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”

halftheskymovement:

Four female computer engineers in Senegal have joined forces to open up the country’s first technology hub run by and for women. "We want to be a role model for girls and for women in tech. They think it’s just for men," says 26-year-old Awa Caba, a specialist app designer and co-founder of Jjiguene Tech Hub. She and her colleagues offer free IT training and programming courses to women and girls. To further help the young women go on to thrive in Senegal’s IT sector, the staff also provide coaching for confidence. Such has been the popularity of the hub that the number of women attending on a regular basis has grown from four to 65 in under two years.Read more via BBC News.

halftheskymovement:

Four female computer engineers in Senegal have joined forces to open up the country’s first technology hub run by and for women. 

"We want to be a role model for girls and for women in tech. They think it’s just for men," says 26-year-old Awa Caba, a specialist app designer and co-founder of Jjiguene Tech Hub. She and her colleagues offer free IT training and programming courses to women and girls. 

To further help the young women go on to thrive in Senegal’s IT sector, the staff also provide coaching for confidence. Such has been the popularity of the hub that the number of women attending on a regular basis has grown from four to 65 in under two years.

Read more via BBC News.

art-conservation:

Malawi’s Lone Conservation Officer Seeks To Save His Country’s Heritage
art-conservation:

Malawi’s Lone Conservation Officer Seeks To Save His Country’s Heritage
art-conservation:

Malawi’s Lone Conservation Officer Seeks To Save His Country’s Heritage

fileformat:

Nyanyai Deng

like every deng on earth looks so good

mariamagda:

Fatoumata Diawara at Webeon Festival in Austin - 04.07.2013Fatou is a guitarist and singer from Mali. Her show today at Webeon World Music Festival in Austin was perhaps my favorite. This woman is so talented and beautiful. At various points throughout the show she taught the audience different dance moves from Africa. Fatou also spoke on Mali and the recent religious war that’s been declared on music . She emphasized the importance of music not only to Malian culture and history but to Africa and the world, for it is “the only language that knows and teaches peace”. If you do not yet know her music go ahead and drift off with the sounds of her mesmerizing voice… 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E82BifytoYYHere is an article from last year about Mali:http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/23/mali-militants-declare-war-music
mariamagda:

Fatoumata Diawara at Webeon Festival in Austin - 04.07.2013Fatou is a guitarist and singer from Mali. Her show today at Webeon World Music Festival in Austin was perhaps my favorite. This woman is so talented and beautiful. At various points throughout the show she taught the audience different dance moves from Africa. Fatou also spoke on Mali and the recent religious war that’s been declared on music . She emphasized the importance of music not only to Malian culture and history but to Africa and the world, for it is “the only language that knows and teaches peace”. If you do not yet know her music go ahead and drift off with the sounds of her mesmerizing voice… 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E82BifytoYYHere is an article from last year about Mali:http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/23/mali-militants-declare-war-music
mariamagda:

Fatoumata Diawara at Webeon Festival in Austin - 04.07.2013Fatou is a guitarist and singer from Mali. Her show today at Webeon World Music Festival in Austin was perhaps my favorite. This woman is so talented and beautiful. At various points throughout the show she taught the audience different dance moves from Africa. Fatou also spoke on Mali and the recent religious war that’s been declared on music . She emphasized the importance of music not only to Malian culture and history but to Africa and the world, for it is “the only language that knows and teaches peace”. If you do not yet know her music go ahead and drift off with the sounds of her mesmerizing voice… 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E82BifytoYYHere is an article from last year about Mali:http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/23/mali-militants-declare-war-music

mariamagda:

Fatoumata Diawara at Webeon Festival in Austin - 04.07.2013

Fatou is a guitarist and singer from Mali. Her show today at Webeon World Music Festival in Austin was perhaps my favorite. This woman is so talented and beautiful. At various points throughout the show she taught the audience different dance moves from Africa. Fatou also spoke on Mali and the recent religious war that’s been declared on music . She emphasized the importance of music not only to Malian culture and history but to Africa and the world, for it is “the only language that knows and teaches peace”. If you do not yet know her music go ahead and drift off with the sounds of her mesmerizing voice… 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E82BifytoYY

Here is an article from last year about Mali:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/23/mali-militants-declare-war-music

humansofnewyork:

"What’s your favorite thing about your brother?"
"He does all the work."

(Limuru, Kenya)

afrikani:

In 2012, a floating school in Lagos’s ‘floating’ slum of Makoko was labelled as ‘illegal’ by authorities who then threatened to demolish it. This year [2014] the school, which is the brainchild of Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi, was nominated for the London-based Design Museum’s Design of the Year award.
afrikani:

In 2012, a floating school in Lagos’s ‘floating’ slum of Makoko was labelled as ‘illegal’ by authorities who then threatened to demolish it. This year [2014] the school, which is the brainchild of Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi, was nominated for the London-based Design Museum’s Design of the Year award.
afrikani:

In 2012, a floating school in Lagos’s ‘floating’ slum of Makoko was labelled as ‘illegal’ by authorities who then threatened to demolish it. This year [2014] the school, which is the brainchild of Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi, was nominated for the London-based Design Museum’s Design of the Year award.

afrikani:

In 2012, a floating school in Lagos’s ‘floating’ slum of Makoko was labelled as ‘illegal’ by authorities who then threatened to demolish it. This year [2014] the school, which is the brainchild of Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi, was nominated for the London-based Design Museum’s Design of the Year award.