medievalpoc:

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Painting. Mother Teresa Juliana, called “the negrita of Salamanca” (+ 1748), supposed daughter of the king of “la Mina Baxa de el Oro” (Guinea), Dominican at the Convento de las Dominicas Duenãs at Salamanca, in adoration.

SOR TERESA CHICABA—the African nun of Salamanca who spent several years in a sequestered monastery after her enslavement—represents the embodiment of the Black Diaspora. Born around 1676 presumably somewhere off the coast of Mina in West Africa (the part that comprises present-day Ghana, Togo, Benin, and Nigeria), captured and enslaved at the age of nine, transported somehow to Spain, and purchased by the Marchioness of Mancera (wife of the Marquis), Chicaba’s story weaves together a series of narratives—about the racial, religious, and national identities of Africans and Europeans in the eighteenth-century—that are difficult to unravel.

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cityafrica:

Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Dakar, Senegal

mermaidsofcolor:

afrodiaspores:

Laura R. Gadson, ”Reception At Ibo Landing,” ca. 2011, a quilt shown in Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore: A Fiber Arts Exhibition, 2012. Filmmaker and author Julie Dash told bell hooks,

The Ibo Landing myth there are two myths and one reality…

Ibo captives, African captives of the Ibo [ethnic group, also spelled “Igbo”], when they were brought to the New World, they refused to live in slavery. There are accounts of them having walked into the water, and then on top of the water all the way back to Africa, you know, rather than live in slavery in chains. There are also myths of them having flown from the water, flown all the way back to Africa. And then there is the story the truth or the myth of them walking into the water and drowning themselves in front of the captors.

I was able, in my research [for “Daughters of the Dust”], to read some of the accounts from the sailors who were on the ship when supposedly it happened, and a lot of the shipmates, the sailors or other crew members, they had nervous breakdowns watching this. Watching the Ibo men and women and children in shackles, walking into the water and holding themselves under the water until they in fact drowned.

And then interestingly enough, in my research, I found that almost every Sea Island has a little inlet, or a little area where the people say, “This is Ibo Landing. This is where it happened. This is where this thing really happened.” And so, why is it that on every little island and there are so many places people say, “This is actually Ibo Landing”? It’s because that message is so strong, so powerful, so sustaining to the tradition of resistance, by any means possible, that every Gullah community embraces this myth. So I learned that myth is very important in the struggle to maintain a sense of self and to move forward into the future. 

because we need reminding 

turbanista:

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

turbanista:

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania
Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”
Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.
A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.
Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.
Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”

Gladys ‘Nomfanekiso’ Mgudlandlu (1923 - 1978)

Gladys Mgundlandlu was born near Peddie, Eastern Cape in 1923 to Mfengu parents.

A dedicated art school teacher, Mgudlandlu began painting for herself in 1952. But it was her grandmother’s death in 1957 that spurred her on to paint seriously. Mgudlandlu was deeply influenced by her rural childhood and had been taught to paint wall murals by her grandmother. She was a self-taught artist and created her own unique African expressionist style of painting using vivid colours with bold, rhythmic brush-strokes to depict landscapes, people, fauna and flora overlaid by the influence of Xhosa folklore.

Mgudlandlu worked in a variety of media using watercolour, oil paints, crayon, gouache, ink and felt-tip pens. She painted after her teaching day by the light of a paraffin lamp to create her naïve, dream-like pictures. The name ‘Nomfanekiso’ means ‘she who paints at night’. She has been criticized for not rooting her work in the socio-political protest genre current in the face of the apartheid experience. However, this is to overlook the spiritual and symbolic importance of her work.

Following the success of her second solo exhibition in 1962, Mgudlandlu said, “I think that I can claim to be the first African woman in the country to hold an exhibition. As far as I know, I am the only African woman who has taken painting seriously. It has become my first love and there is nothing else I want to do.”

halftheskymovement:

Four female computer engineers in Senegal have joined forces to open up the country’s first technology hub run by and for women. "We want to be a role model for girls and for women in tech. They think it’s just for men," says 26-year-old Awa Caba, a specialist app designer and co-founder of Jjiguene Tech Hub. She and her colleagues offer free IT training and programming courses to women and girls. To further help the young women go on to thrive in Senegal’s IT sector, the staff also provide coaching for confidence. Such has been the popularity of the hub that the number of women attending on a regular basis has grown from four to 65 in under two years.Read more via BBC News.

halftheskymovement:

Four female computer engineers in Senegal have joined forces to open up the country’s first technology hub run by and for women. 

"We want to be a role model for girls and for women in tech. They think it’s just for men," says 26-year-old Awa Caba, a specialist app designer and co-founder of Jjiguene Tech Hub. She and her colleagues offer free IT training and programming courses to women and girls. 

To further help the young women go on to thrive in Senegal’s IT sector, the staff also provide coaching for confidence. Such has been the popularity of the hub that the number of women attending on a regular basis has grown from four to 65 in under two years.

Read more via BBC News.

art-conservation:

Malawi’s Lone Conservation Officer Seeks To Save His Country’s Heritage
art-conservation:

Malawi’s Lone Conservation Officer Seeks To Save His Country’s Heritage
art-conservation:

Malawi’s Lone Conservation Officer Seeks To Save His Country’s Heritage